Oct. 20, 2020

Let’s change our practices and the way we do things

Let’s change our practices and the way we do things

In The Sustainable Hour no 337 on 21 October 2020 we have two people closely associated with the making of the award-winning film ‘In My Blood It Runs‘: Traditional elder William Tilmouth and the film’s director Maya Newell.









In The Sustainable Hour on 21 October 2020 we have two people closely associated with the making of the award-winning film ‘In My Blood It Runs‘: Traditional elder William Tilmouth, founder of the Children’s Ground and an advisor on the film, and the film’s director Maya Newell.



This film was 10 years in the making. This involved much yarning and letting go of colonising attitudes by the white film crew as they built trust with the First Nations community in Central Australia. It was very patient work that involved building trust and empowering an entire family to tell their story.



“It’s a contest of space between humanity and nature. Let’s give nature some space as well, because at the end of the day: We abuse it, it will spank us,” Tilmouth says. “Let’s change our practices and the way we do things.”



Colin Mockett begins his Global Outlook with a new report stating that global greenhouse-gas emissions are down 8.8 per cent due to worldwide Covid restrictions – but countered with the release of figures showing that global average temperatures in 2019 were 1.1 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, and 2020 is set to mark the end of the hottest 5-year period on record.



There are positive signs following the election wins in New Zealand and the ACT – both of which winners were Labor-Green coalitions with strong emissions-reduction policies, and Denmark’s adoption of a policy that all future government policy decisions must take the impact on climate and environment on board. This is what ‘putting climate first in every decision’ looks like at a national level.



Colin rounds his outlook segment off with two newly-released UN reports, one stating that world-wide coal-fired energy production is in sharp decline, and the other noting that climate change is responsible for a doubling of the numbers of natural disasters since 2000.



Until next week – don’t forget to vote before 6pm on this Friday 23 October when you can Vote the Difference if you haven’t already.



We start and end the hour with a quote – an unusually strong statement – from this speech by the United Nations’ Secretary-General Antonio Guterres:













“If we don’t act now, this century may be one of humanity’s last.” ~ Antonio Guterres, United Nations Secretary-General




"We've upset the energy balance of the entire planet,""Year after year we see temperature records being broken.""This is a warning message from the Earth itself,""We ignore it at our peril."#ActOnClimate #ClimateChange https://t.co/xW0xVP5PLZ— Paul Dawson (@PaulEDawson) October 21, 2020





The number of natural disasters has almost doubled over the past 20 years and the climate crisis is to blame, the UN said.